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Title: The Fascinating Growth and Formation of Supermassive Black Holes

Summary

New data obtained from the research conducted by the University of Cambridge reveals intriguing facts about the rapid growth and formation of supermassive black holes in the early universe. While it has long been believed that black holes develop over […]

Zvezde se rađaju, crne rupe rastu: Mistorija formiranja supermasivnih crnih rupa

New data obtained from the research conducted by the University of Cambridge reveals intriguing facts about the rapid growth and formation of supermassive black holes in the early universe. While it has long been believed that black holes develop over billions of years, this discovery offers alternative paths for the formation of these cosmic phenomena.

Scientists have long assumed that black holes arise from the gravitational collapse of remnants of giant stars. However, recent research suggests that black holes can become supermassive and several million times larger than the mass of our Sun in an exceptionally short period of time.

According to Professor Roberto Maiolino, the leading author of the study, “Observing such an enormous black hole in the very early stages of the universe means that we must consider alternative explanations for its formation.”

Based on the new findings, black holes can develop as subtly larger versions of ordinary black holes. These supermassive black holes can absorb matter five times faster than previously believed, explaining their rapid growth.

Previously, the black hole GN-z11, located within a smaller galaxy, hosted intense energy emitted by its energetic center. However, it has been discovered that this black hole gradually consumes matter from its host galaxy. This process expels matter rapidly, akin to an ultrafast wind, which can lead to the cessation of star formation and the gradual disappearance of the entire galaxy.

These new insights not only provide a deeper understanding of the formation of supermassive black holes but also offer us a glimpse into the dynamic and unpredictable process of cosmic evolution. Future research will be crucial to shed light on the mysteries of these cosmic giants and further deepen our knowledge of the surrounding universe.

Frequently Asked Questions about the Growth of Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe

1. How were black holes previously believed to form?
Black holes were believed to form as a result of the gravitational collapse of remnants of giant stars.

2. What are the new insights into the formation of supermassive black holes?
New studies reveal that supermassive black holes can form much more rapidly compared to previous beliefs.

3. What explanations are now being considered for the formation of supermassive black holes?
Explanations involving the development of black holes as subtly larger versions of ordinary black holes are being considered.

4. Why do supermassive black holes grow so rapidly?
Supermassive black holes can absorb matter five times faster than previously believed, which explains their rapid growth.

5. How can a black hole affect the formation of new stars and galaxies?
The black hole GN-z11, which hosted intense energy, gradually consumes matter from its host galaxy, leading to the cessation of star formation and the disappearance of the entire galaxy.

6. What are the implications of the new insights into supermassive black holes?
The new insights provide a deeper understanding of the formation of supermassive black holes and offer insights into the evolution of the universe. They also enable further exploration of these cosmic phenomena and enhance our knowledge of the universe.

Key Term Definitions:
– Black hole: a region of space where gravity is so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape.
– Gravitational collapse: the process in which a massive star collapses suddenly due to its own gravity.
– Supermassive black holes: black holes that have a mass millions or billions of times greater than the mass of our Sun.
– Subtly larger versions: enlarged versions of ordinary black holes.

Suggested Related Links:
– University of Cambridge: [link]
– Black hole – Wikipedia: [link]
– NASA: [link]