Вештачка интелигенција

The Future of Copyright in the Age of Artificial Intelligence: The Legal Battle Between New York Times and OpenAI

Summary

The rapid technological advancements of recent decades have brought significant changes to how we access information and content. However, this transformation has not been without legal challenges, particularly regarding copyright. The latest example of this complex issue is the legal […]

Pravna borba između New York Times-a i OpenAI: Budućnost autorskih prava u doba veštačke inteligencije

The rapid technological advancements of recent decades have brought significant changes to how we access information and content. However, this transformation has not been without legal challenges, particularly regarding copyright. The latest example of this complex issue is the legal battle between New York Times and OpenAI, the creators of the artificial intelligence known as ChatGPT.

Last year, New York Times filed a lawsuit against OpenAI and Microsoft, alleging that these companies used copyrighted content from the Times to train their AI models and profited from it. OpenAI denied any wrongdoing, but the fundamental question remains: how much can new technological tools use copyrighted material without explicit permission and compensation?

This legal battle is reminiscent of the Napster case, the popular file-sharing platform of the late 1990s. The lawsuit against Napster set a precedent for how technological platforms handle copyright. However, that was before the advent of the iPhone, YouTube, and generative artificial intelligence.

This case not only raises questions about the future of journalism but also about the future of copyright laws, innovation, and specifically the future of OpenAI and other companies involved in generative artificial intelligence. Some proponents of technological progress argue that restricting the use of AI could stifle innovation in its early stages. On the other hand, media companies insist that even exciting tech companies must pay when they use copyrighted content.

Legal experts and observers agree that the New York Times’ lawsuit against OpenAI is significant. The Times has a strong case, but OpenAI has a lot to lose – maybe even its existence.

OpenAI has offered a straightforward solution to this conflict – pre-paying copyright holders. The company already has licensing agreements with organizations like the Associated Press and Axel Springer. However, how much OpenAI is willing to pay the media remains unclear.

New York Times is not the only one suing OpenAI and other tech companies for copyright infringement. The list of authors and entertainers filing lawsuits against these companies has been growing since the introduction of ChatGPT in 2022.

While this situation is highly complex, history teaches us that technological progress often brings about legal challenges and the establishment of new rules. Just as the Sony-Betamax case in 1984 allowed people to record TV shows without infringing copyright, this case could set new standards for technological innovation and copyright.

However, answers to these questions won’t come quickly. The verdict in the New York Times vs. OpenAI case will take years, and even then, many questions will remain open. “I think generative AI can significantly impact copyright, just as the printing press did,” said James Grimmelmann, a professor of digital information law at Cornell Law School. But that will likely take some more time, as Vox reports.

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