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Pakistan’s Digital Security Journey: Embracing Predictive Cybersecurity with AI

Summary

In the fast-paced digital era, Pakistan finds itself facing a critical setback in terms of digital security, lagging behind by more than two decades. To bridge this gap, experts agree that it is urgently necessary for the country to adopt […]

Pakistan’s Digital Security Journey: Embracing Predictive Cybersecurity with AI

In the fast-paced digital era, Pakistan finds itself facing a critical setback in terms of digital security, lagging behind by more than two decades. To bridge this gap, experts agree that it is urgently necessary for the country to adopt predictive cybersecurity strategies infused with Artificial Intelligence (AI) to catch up with the rest of the world.

Recently, the Pakistan Institute of International Affairs (PIIA) organized a conference titled “Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Cyber Security” to address this pressing concern. During the conference, experts emphasized the need to promote cybersecurity awareness through educational institutions, particularly universities. They also stressed the importance of conducting webinars and seminars to educate the general public about the challenges associated with cyberspace.

Furthermore, the conference highlighted the significance of allowing individuals to work freely in bringing about necessary changes in the field of cybersecurity. The experts urged the government to support such initiatives, acknowledging that collective efforts are crucial to securing the digital landscape.

Ammar Hussain Jaffri, a former senior official of the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) who headed the National Response Centre for Cyber Crime (N3RC), shared his two-decade experience in cybersecurity. Jaffri pointed out that although Pakistan once outpaced India in cybersecurity initiatives, the country has regressed over the past 20 years, falling behind its previous position.

Jaffri emphasized the need for predictive cybersecurity combined with AI capabilities. Such advanced techniques can accurately predict possible cyber attacks with up to 90% accuracy. He provided an example of how AI was successfully employed to detect anomalies in the passport system of the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA), identifying individuals with fake passports who were entered into random family trees for record-keeping.

Rahim Ali, the chief technology officer of an international business outsourcing firm, shed light on the fact that Pakistan is currently ill-prepared for cyber warfare. However, he emphasized that the country has no choice but to become ready. Ali emphasized that cybersecurity extends beyond computers; it encompasses a wide range of aspects that pose threats in the digital landscape.

Maliha Masood, an IT professional well-versed in risk management and information security management, drew attention to the existence of both good and bad actors in cyberspace. She emphasized that individuals who believe their privacy remains intact in cyberspace are living in an imaginary world. It is crucial to acknowledge that cyberspace is a realm filled with potential risks and vulnerabilities.

The conference also underlined the importance of having indigenous weaponry to mitigate the risks of manipulating modern weapons through AI technology. As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, indigenous weaponry provides a means of reducing the reliance on potentially vulnerable or exploitable systems.

It is evident that Pakistan’s digital security capabilities require urgent enhancement through the adoption of predictive cybersecurity techniques infused with AI. By embracing these advancements, Pakistan can strengthen its position in the information world of cyberspace and effectively mitigate potential risks posed by cyber warfare.

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