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New amazing images of Uranus: Discovering its rings and the mysterious Zeta ring

Summary

Scientists have recently captured astonishing images of Uranus using the James Webb Space Telescope, revealing its extraordinary rings and particularly the enigmatic Zeta ring. The telescope captured infrared wavelengths that are not visible to the naked eye, giving the image […]

Spektakularne slike Urana: Otkriveni prstenovi i tajanstveni Zeta prsten+

Scientists have recently captured astonishing images of Uranus using the James Webb Space Telescope, revealing its extraordinary rings and particularly the enigmatic Zeta ring. The telescope captured infrared wavelengths that are not visible to the naked eye, giving the image an exceptional appearance of a glowing blue marble that transitions into a black ocean.

These Webb images are far more vivid than the generic ones captured by Voyager 3 in the 1980s. These spectacular displays unveil an unusual and dynamic world of ice with exciting atmospheric characteristics. The telescope team is thrilled about the discovery of new details about Uranus.

In addition to the standard rings, James Webb was able to photograph the “elusive Zeta ring.” This faint ring is the innermost ring surrounding Uranus, and it can now be observed thanks to the telescope’s advanced sensors. The image also depicts the planet’s northern polar cap of clouds and a white spot near the planet’s center.

The image also showcases Uranus’ moons, specifically 14 out of the total 27. Among the bodies depicted are Oberon, Titania, Umbriel, Juliet, Perdita, Rosalind, Puck, Belinda, Desdemona, Cressida, Ariel, Miranda, Bianca, and Portia.

Using four NIRCam filters, Webb discovered rich details of the near-infrared spectrum. These filters enable the visualization of the planet in blue, cyan, yellow, and orange. Previous images of Uranus shared by NASA only displayed two filters, resulting in a less detailed representation.

Uranus is known for its icy composition and extreme weather conditions. It rotates at an angle of approximately 98 degrees, making it a “sideways sleeping” planet. Scientists believe that the images captured by the Webb telescope will contribute to a better understanding of Uranus and its characteristics. Furthermore, these images can provide useful information about other ringed ice planets in different solar systems.

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