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Advancements in Artificial Intelligence and New Imaging Methods: A Conference Recap

Summary

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) recently held a conference titled “Advancements in Artificial Intelligence and New Imaging Methods,” showcasing the latest technologies in Hyperpolarized C-13, Midfield, and Information Commons. This conference served as the culmination of the Center […]

Advancements in Artificial Intelligence and New Imaging Methods: A Conference Recap

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) recently held a conference titled “Advancements in Artificial Intelligence and New Imaging Methods,” showcasing the latest technologies in Hyperpolarized C-13, Midfield, and Information Commons. This conference served as the culmination of the Center for Intelligent Imaging’s three-year anniversary celebrations.

Renowned speakers, including Sharmila Majumdar, Claus-C. Glüer, Daniel Vigneron, and Jan-B. Hövener, delivered introductory speeches, providing attendees with insights into the latest breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and new imaging methods. The goal was to foster collaborations within UCSF as well as between UCSF and Christian-Albrechts University in Kiel.

Christopher Hess, Chief of the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, kicked off the second day of the conference with a talk titled “Advancing the Application of Artificial Intelligence in Imaging.”

Akshay Chaudhary from Stanford University presented a lecture on “Efficient Deep Learning in Radiology: From Vision to Language,” while Mirabela Rusu, also from Stanford University, discussed the use of artificial intelligence in transitioning between real-time ultrasound and pathology images for prostate cancer detection.

Dan Vigneron, the director of the Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology Center, conducted a Q&A session on Hyperpolarized C13. Following that, Jane Wang, MD, shared the latest updates on the clinical application of hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Michael Ohliger, MD, PhD, spoke about the integration of C13 in prostate and liver research, and Renuka Sriram, PhD, presented preclinical studies on HP C13 at UCSF compared to their counterparts at the University of Kiel.

Peder Larson, PhD, discussed deep learning in the assessment of prostate and kidney cancer images. Jesse Courtier, MD, Beck Olson, and Maddie Hess jointly explained their novel use of machine learning in creating 3D augmented reality models, highlighting the advantages over virtual reality. Yang Yang, PhD, initiated a session on high-field imaging with a discussion on advanced AI technologies in 0.55T mid-field MRI. Subsequently, Michael Ohliger, MD, PhD, delved into liver imaging, while Rupsa Bhattacharjee, PhD, shared her observations on quantitative knee imaging.

The conference concluded with a discussion on future steps. Attendees identified areas for potential collaboration in medical and AI research between their institutions. In a creative brainstorming session, one idea proposed using augmented reality as a tool for teaching and explaining the vast amounts of data generated by AI research. Researchers from UCSF likened this concept to the popular game, Pokémon Go, while those from Kiel drew parallels to underwater mapping experts visualizing medical data.

Efforts like these are essential for advancing future research and fostering collaboration among institutions worldwide.

For more information about the conference or to access conference recordings, feel free to reach out to the administrative team of ci2 via email at Annie ([email protected]) or Steaven ([email protected]).

Who organized the conference on advancements in artificial intelligence and new imaging methods?
The conference was organized by UCSF (University of California, San Francisco), with the Center for Intelligent Imaging (ci2) and the Hyperpolarized MRI Technology Center (HMTRC) serving as hosts.

Who were the key speakers at the conference?
The key speakers at the conference were Akshay Chaudhary, PhD, from Stanford University, whose talk focused on efficient deep learning in radiology, and Mirabela Rusu, PhD, also from Stanford University, who discussed the use of artificial intelligence in transitioning between real-time ultrasound and pathology images for prostate cancer detection.

What were some of the topics covered by the conference speakers?
The speakers covered a wide range of topics, including hyperpolarized C13 imaging, deep learning in the assessment of prostate and kidney cancer images, the application of artificial intelligence in creating 3D augmented reality models, advancements in mid-field MRI technology, liver imaging, quantitative knee imaging, and many more.

How did the conference conclude?
The conference concluded with a discussion on future steps and the identification of collaboration areas between institutions. One idea proposed was the use of augmented reality as a tool for understanding and explaining the vast amounts of data generated by artificial intelligence.

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